All items with the origin: Artillery from The United States - Special Order Cannons

 
4

Dahlgren Light & Heavy 12-pounder Boat Howitzer

In 1848 Lieutenant John A. Dahlgren, of the U.S. Navy, was assigned to determine the suitability of army mountain howitzers for mastheads, small boats, and landing parties. Not satisfied with their performance, Dahlgren initiated what was to become the development of a family of similar small bronze…

3

30-Pounder (4.2) Parrott Rifle

The 4.2-inch (30-pounder), like the 10′s and 20′s, came in two models for the Army, differing primarily in the muzzle swell and a doorknob-shaped cascabel for the old model compared to a straight muzzle with more elongated cascabel-bored horizontally for elevating mechanism for the new. Parrotts was…

PEX Model 1841 Bron. Field Howitzer

U.S. Model 1841 Field Howitzer 24-pounder

Companion weapons to Civil War guns were Howitzers-smoothbore cannon. As a rule, they are designed to throw large projectiles with comparatively light charges of powder concentrated at the bottom of the tube by means of a chamber. They were lighter than guns of the same caliber and…

3

U.S. Model 1841 12-Pounder, Heavy

The largest gun in the family of cannon design known as the Model of 1841 is theĀ  12-pounder gun. This behemoth cannon was replaced in 1857 by the Napoleon because of its weight. We offer this gun in naval gun bronze with a steel sleeve or in…

DSC01401

British Light 6-Pounder (Circa 1776)

The British Light 6-pounder Gun is from the Treatise of Artillery 1780 by John Muller and the Course of Artillery by C. W. Rudyerd 1793. Originally cast in bronze but often seen in iron this barrel was used during the American Revolution and the War of 1812….

Pressed Web - Web Design, Websites, Graphic Design, and Video Editing from Huntington, WV, Ashland, KY, and Ironton, OH