All items with the carriage: No. 1 Field Carriage cast in Ductile Iron - (Call for pricing)

 
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Tredegar Parrott Rifle – 2.9 (10-pounder)

Tredegar produced the first two pieces substantially in accord with a drawing made to copy the West Point Foundry’s U.S. Parrott. An obvious deviation from the U.S. model, which is almost a Tredegar hallmark for 2.9 and 4.2-inch Parrott rifles (but not for those of 3.67-inch bore),…

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Tredegar Iron 12-Pounder Field Howitzer

Tredegar produced thirty howitzers of cast iron between 13 November and 14 June 1862. To compensate for the ample demonstrated inferiority of cast iron in comparison with bronze, about 100 pounds of metal were applied where it belonged, at the breech. Most important, the grotesque ornamentation, so…

6

Tredegar Iron 6-Pounder / 3-inch rifle

Further insight comes from study of Tredegar cast iron 6-pounder smooth bores and 3-inch rifles.¬† Joseph Reid Anderson, the astute owner of the Tredegar Iron Works, evidently foresaw critical shortages of copper and tin. As early as 1861 he began to take advantage of almost unlimited quantities…

4

Noble Bros. and Co. Bronze & Iron 6-Pounder / 3-inch Rifle

Noble Brothers and Company of Rome, Georgia, produced at least twenty-two 6-pounders guns, fifteen of cast iron and seven of bronze. There is also evidence because of surviving pieces that Noble Bros. using the same pattern produced¬† 3-inch rifles in cast iron. One distinguishing characteristic of Noble…

5

U.S. 3-inch Ordnance Rifle

The Yankee Three-inch rifle was a dead shot at any distance under a mile. They could hit the end of a flour barrel more often than miss, unless the gunner got rattled. This tribute was grudgingly given by a member of Lumsden’s Confederate battery while it was…

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