Cannons

 
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U.S. Model 1838 24-Pounder Coehorn Mortar

From the beginning of time, improved defenses have encouraged development of new offenses. When fortifications became too strong to breach by direct fire, high angle plunging “vertical” fire was adopted. At Namur in 1692 the Dutch under Manno, Baron van Coehoorn, faced the French under his rival,…

PhEx Mt. Howitzer Front

12-pounder Mountain Howitzer, Model of 1835

The bronze mountain howitzer, originally classified for mountain service, was in fact a light fieldpiece of great mobility for use in all kinds of rough terrain. This little brute could shoot the  same ammunition as the 12-pounder field howitzer and the 12-pounder Napoleon (except for solid shot)….

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U.S. Model 1841 6-Pounder

The Model 1841  6-pounder gun was one of a “family of weapons” designed by the U.S. Army Ordnance Department in 1841 (companion pieces were the Model 1841 12-Pdr., 24-Pdr. and 32-Pdr field Howitzers; the Model 1841 12-Pdr Gun and the 12-Pdr Mountain Howitzer). The effectiveness of the…

PEX Model 1841 12-Pdr Field Howitzer

U.S. Model 1841 Field Howitzer 12-Pounder

Companion weapons to Civil War guns were Howitzers-smoothbore cannon. As a rule, designed to throw large projectiles with comparatively light charges of powder concentrated at the bottom of the tube by means of a chamber. They were lighter than guns of the same caliber and at short…

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U.S. Model 1841 12-Pounder, Heavy

The largest gun in the family of cannon design known as the Model of 1841 is the  12-pounder gun. This behemoth cannon was replaced in 1857 by the Napoleon because of its weight. We offer this gun in naval gun bronze with a steel sleeve or in…

PEX Model 1841 Bron. Field Howitzer

U.S. Model 1841 Field Howitzer 24-pounder

Companion weapons to Civil War guns were Howitzers-smoothbore cannon. As a rule, they are designed to throw large projectiles with comparatively light charges of powder concentrated at the bottom of the tube by means of a chamber. They were lighter than guns of the same caliber and…

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U.S. Model 1857 12-Pounder Napoleon

Five centuries of evolution of bronze field pieces were climaxed by a single smoothbore. One cannon was to outperform, and, during the Civil War to make obsolete, both 6-pounder guns and 12-pounder howitzers of mixed light field artillery batteries. Although officially called the “light 12-pounder gun” in…

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U.S. 3-inch Ordnance Rifle

The Yankee Three-inch rifle was a dead shot at any distance under a mile. They could hit the end of a flour barrel more often than miss, unless the gunner got rattled. This tribute was grudgingly given by a member of Lumsden’s Confederate battery while it was…

PE,PD 2.9 Parrott New 2

U.S. Parrott Rifle 2.9 (10-Pounder) & 3-inch

The Parrott Rifle was designed by Robert Parker Parrott, a captain of Ordnance in the United States. As an inspector of cannon at West Point Foundry, Cold Springs, New York, he was asked to resign his commission and become superintendent of the foundry. It was there, just…

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U.S. Parrott Rifle 3.67 (20-Pounder)

The 3.67-inch, U.S. “20-pounder” parrott like it’s smaller cousin went through a model change. In addition to the army type a navy type was introduced that was a little longer (91.5 inches) and had the navy type cascabel. Our version (Army) is one solid casting that is…

Shiloh 11

32-pounder Chambered Cannon of 42 Hundredweight

32-pounders of 42 hundredweight served on the largest sloops of the war. From 1842 into 1849, all six ion gun founders: Alger, Bellona, Columbia, Fort Pitt, Tredegar and West Point, produced 414, of which 11 have been found. Steen Cannon & Ordnance Works had the opportunity to…

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30-Pounder (4.2) Parrott Rifle

The 4.2-inch (30-pounder), like the 10′s and 20′s, came in two models for the Army, differing primarily in the muzzle swell and a doorknob-shaped cascabel for the old model compared to a straight muzzle with more elongated cascabel-bored horizontally for elevating mechanism for the new. Parrotts was…

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24-pounder Iron Siege Gun, Pattern of 1845

Since heavy artillery made up the first line of defense of the United States, more attention was paid to it, and money spent on it, than on field artillery. In January, 1860 there were 61 forts and batteries that defended America’s coastal cities, this does not account…

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18-Pounder Iron Siege Gun, Model of 1845

Since heavy artillery made up the first line of defense of the United States, more attention was paid to it, and money spent on it, than on field artillery. In January, 1860 there were 61 forts and batteries that defended America’s coastal cities, this does not account…

Weird Cannon

6-Pounder (2.6-inch) Wiard Rifle

A former Canadian, working for the United States during the war, invented several pieces of light ordnance which, although apparently excellent weapons, do not seem to have been particular popular. Norman Wiard (1826-1896) was born in Ontario where at an early age he became foreman of a…

PExTred. Coehorn Side,

Tredegar Coehorn Mortar

The Tredegar Coehorn Mortar is the smallest cannon we offer in the Tredegar Foundry Collection. Cast just like the original using gray iron, we insert a steel sleeve with a sub-bore of 4.62 inches still making this mortar a true 12-pounder.

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Tredegar Mountain Rifle, Bronze/Iron

The 2.25-inch Mountain Rifle appears in two Confederate ordnance manuals with as much detail as any other field piece of artillery.  Called Model 1862, records of its manufacture were entered in three Tredegar sources. Eighteen pieces were apparently cast from bronze and one forged from wrought iron…

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Tredegar Iron 6-Pounder / 3-inch rifle

Further insight comes from study of Tredegar cast iron 6-pounder smooth bores and 3-inch rifles.  Joseph Reid Anderson, the astute owner of the Tredegar Iron Works, evidently foresaw critical shortages of copper and tin. As early as 1861 he began to take advantage of almost unlimited quantities…

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Tredegar Iron 12-Pounder Field Howitzer

Tredegar produced thirty howitzers of cast iron between 13 November and 14 June 1862. To compensate for the ample demonstrated inferiority of cast iron in comparison with bronze, about 100 pounds of metal were applied where it belonged, at the breech. Most important, the grotesque ornamentation, so…

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Tredegar Parrott Rifle – 2.9 (10-pounder)

Tredegar produced the first two pieces substantially in accord with a drawing made to copy the West Point Foundry’s U.S. Parrott. An obvious deviation from the U.S. model, which is almost a Tredegar hallmark for 2.9 and 4.2-inch Parrott rifles (but not for those of 3.67-inch bore),…

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Tredegar Iron 12-Pounder Napoleon, Model 1863

The largest number of identical Confederate Napoleons were those made of iron. During 1864 the Tredegar Iron Works produced 105, with another 20 early in 1865. Tredegar Iron Napoleons were reinforced by a breech band, presumably of wrough iron. These tubes look like a parrott rifle on…

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Selma Arsenal Coehorn Mortar

While both armies were becoming entrenched late in the Civil War, the Confederacy also found increasing need for Coehorns. Although the most common Coehorns were made at the Tredegar Iron Works, A possible source of additional Coehorns comes from the research of Larry Daniel. Studying the records…

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Noble Bros. and Co. Bronze & Iron 6-Pounder / 3-inch Rifle

Noble Brothers and Company of Rome, Georgia, produced at least twenty-two 6-pounders guns, fifteen of cast iron and seven of bronze. There is also evidence because of surviving pieces that Noble Bros. using the same pattern produced  3-inch rifles in cast iron. One distinguishing characteristic of Noble…

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Augusta Foundry or Type 5 12-Pounder Napoleon

  The familiar Confederate Napoleon that is very recognizable is characterized by absence of muzzle swell, sensibly uniform taper of the chase, a cylindrical reinforce which reverts to the Federal standard at 15 inches in length, and a slender knob and neck variously described as “grain of…

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Dahlgren Light & Heavy 12-pounder Boat Howitzer

In 1848 Lieutenant John A. Dahlgren, of the U.S. Navy, was assigned to determine the suitability of army mountain howitzers for mastheads, small boats, and landing parties. Not satisfied with their performance, Dahlgren initiated what was to become the development of a family of similar small bronze…

British Coehorn Mortar Photo

British Coehorn Mortar of 4.6-inch From Rudyerd Circa 1780

From the beginning of time, improved defenses have encouraged development of new offenses. When fortifications became too strong to breach by direct fire, high angle plunging “vertical” fire was adopted. At Namur in 1692 the Dutch under Manno, Baron van Coehoorn, faced the French under his rival,…

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British Light 6-Pounder (Circa 1776)

The British Light 6-pounder Gun is from the Treatise of Artillery 1780 by John Muller and the Course of Artillery by C. W. Rudyerd 1793. Originally cast in bronze but often seen in iron this barrel was used during the American Revolution and the War of 1812….

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Ames 3-pounder / 4-pounder

The mystery gun; WHY? because no one knows for sure anything about this beautiful gun. Although there are several of these cannons that still exists,  why they were made or who they were made for is still a mystery. Probably sold to Home-Guard units to protect towns…

Woodruff 5 web

2-1/8-inch Woodruff Gun

James Woodruff was a prominent citizen of Quincy, Illonois, whose business interests included real estate and the Woodruff and Hayes Carriage Co. He found time to serve as a member of the delegation to Washington to suggest Quincy as a good location for a proposed national arsenal….

Swivel cannon 3 pd

Bent’s Old Fort Swivel Gun

Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site in La Junta, CO, helps tell the story of survival in the “Great American Desert.” Fur traders William and Charles Bent built the fort in 1833. Durning its heyday before the Mexican-American War the fort on the Santa Fe Trail was…

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